#TrainingMondays | Deep Fried Turkey PSA

As we prepare ourselves for Thanksgiving this week, now is a great time to remind not only the communities we serve, but also ourselves, about the inherent dangers of a very popular way to prepare Thanksgiving dinner. Deep frying turkeys has become very popular as the deep frying process helps the turkey retain a lot of its moisture, resulting in a crispy skin and a bird that is juicy and delicious. There are some real dangers associated with deep frying a turkey, so much in fact that the:

NFPA “discourages the use of outdoor gas-fueled turkey fryers that immerse the turkey in hot oil.”

NFPA continues to believe that turkey fryers that use cooking oil, as currently designed, are not suitable for safe use by even a well-informed and careful consumer. These turkey fryers use a substantial quantity of cooking oil at high temperatures and units currently available for home use pose a significant danger that hot oil will be released at some point during the cooking process. In addition, the burners that heat the oil can ignite spilled oil. The use of turkey fryers by consumers can lead to devastating burns, other injuries, and the destruction of property. NFPA urges those who prefer fried turkey to seek out professional establishments, such as grocery stores, specialty food retailers, and restaurants, for the preparation of the dish, or consider a new type of “oil-less” turkey fryer.”

Insurance companies like State Farm have stepped up offering some helpful tips for anyone who wishes to deep fry their turkey:

  1. Keep outdoor fryers off decks, out of garages and a safe distance away from trees and other structures.
  2. Make sure the turkey is thawed and dry before cooking. Ice or water that mixes into the hot oil can cause flare-ups.
  3. Watch the weather. Never operate a fryer outdoors in the rain or snow.
  4. Place the fryer on a level surface, and avoid moving it once it’s in use.
  5. Leave 2 feet between the tank and the burner when using a propane-powered fryer.
  6. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to avoid overfilling. Oil can ignite when it makes contact with the burner.
  7. Choose a smaller turkey for frying. A bird that’s 8 to 10 pounds is best; pass on turkeys over 12 pounds.
  8. Never leave fryers unattended.
  9. Purchase a fryer with temperature controls, and watch the oil temperature carefully. Cooking oil that is heated beyond its smoke point can catch fire. If you notice the oil is smoking, turn the fryer off.
  10. Turn off the burner before lowering the turkey into the oil. Once the turkey is submerged, turn the burner on.
  11. Wear goggles to shield your eyes, use oven mitts to protect your hands and arms and keep a grease-rated fire extinguisher close by.
  12. Skip the stuffing when frying turkey, and avoid water-based marinades.
  13. Keep children and pets away from the fryer at all times.
  14. Once finished, carefully remove the pot from the burner, place it on a level surface and cover to let the oil cool overnight before disposing.
  15. Opt for an oil-less fryer. This uses infrared heat, rather than oil, to cook the turkey.

Even celebrities such as William Shatner have joined in offering his advice and experience. 

We would like to wish everyone a very happy and safe Thanksgiving.

About Colt Roy

Editor and Photojournalist for SConFire.com. Currently employed by the Department of Defense as a Firefighter/EMT. Past North Charleston Fire Department and Whitesville Fire Department. Colt is also the owner of 3 House Photography where his work that doesn't go to SConFire.com is published. Colt uses Canon gear and is currently shooting with 5D Mkiii and 6D cameras along with the 24-105 F4L, 70-200 2.8L IS ii, and 14 2.8L ii Canon lenses along with the Sigma 50 1.4 Art and 150-600 Sport lenses. Colt also uses a 360Fly HD 360 camera to capture events as they unfold.